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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.


 

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* * * A T T E N T I O N   T O   M Y   R E A D E R S * * *

My postings have been spotty over the last couple of weeks due to medical problems. I appreciate your understanding while I am recovering.

I will be posting less detailed articles except for especially important events. For the next few months, I have started a oral history project. Parts of that history will be posted here.

Thank you for your understanding.

Gerald Boerner

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb_thumb_

I first read Anne Frank’s diary while taking second year German in college. This was the German version! I believe that this made the impact of this reading even more meaningful. As the German phrases, with their precision of meaning, yielded their richness of meaning. When this is coupled with the fact that the diary was written by a 15 year old girl hiding from the Nazis in occupied Amsterdam..

One can only wonder what she was going through each day. But wait! we do know what she was thinking because she recorded it in here diary; that diary was retrieved and revealed to the world by her father returned from Auschwitz after the war. He then shared this intimate account of little Anne’s experience in that small set of attic rooms GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1676 Words ]
    

    

4-30-12 ANNE FRANKAnne Frank. — AP Photo/HO
    

Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a German-Jewish teenager who was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She and her family, along with four others, spent 25 months during World War II in an annex of rooms above her father’s office in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

After being betrayed to the Nazis, Anne, her family, and the others living with them were arrested and deported to Nazi concentration camps. In March of 1945, nine months after she was arrested, Anne Frank died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen. She was fifteen years old.

Her diary, saved during the war by one of the family’s helpers, Miep Gies, was first published in 1947. Today, her diary has been translated into 67 languages and is one of the most widely read books in the world.  (Anne Frank Web Site)

    

Quotations Related to Anne Frank:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/a/anne_frank.html ]
    

“Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.”
— Anne Frank

“Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart.”
— Anne Frank

“Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction.”
— Anne Frank

“Boys will be boys. And even that wouldn’t matter if only we could prevent girls from being girls.”
— Anne Frank

continue reading…

Written by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb_thumb_

Good Morning, My FB Family…

Well, I’m back to my regular wake up time — about 4:30 am! I love getting up early enough to get my thoughts straight, watch the morning news to catch the breaking events of the day, and start posting my different pieces. I had always thought of myself as a night person; but now I really thrive on the early morning hours. While I was taking my photography classes, this would be the time that I would get ready to leave on my morning trek to my favorite photo spots to catch the predawn and period right around sunrise. I got some of my best photos at this time. It was also a time that I could catch the Metrolink train to go into downtown LA or down to the beach area of San Juan Capistrano.

I’m partially back, in that I am now able to get up and start functioning at this early hour. Perhaps when I get a lift for my new power chair on my Sequoia, I’ll be able to get to the Metrolink station to begin my daily treks again. I certainly hope so. (Too bad the Dial-a-Ride shuttle doesn’t start moving before 8 am! I could use a ride to the Metrolink station at about 5 am. Oh well…) What’s great about retirement is that I can get up early and start my day while letting my wonderful Gracie sleep in to awake on her own schedule.

327664_2173749476949_101757815_o

So, this morning I was greeted by a relatively warm temp of 48; that’s about what was predicted. The high today is predicted to be in the low 80s. And this is the 3rd of April? I guess Mother Nature is going through her schizophrenic phase where she can’t decide whether to be winter or summer. The solution seems to be bouncing back and forth between the two seasons. But, well, this is SoCal after all. What we consider cold is a very desirable temp for others in my FB and genetic family. Isn’t life a fun journey through the days of the year.

I guess, we all need to be thankful that we do wake up each morning. That is a sign the good Lord has given us another day in which to show our appreciation. So I am happy for each day that I’m given. It is indeed a gift and I want to make the most of it. My postings and writings are part of my celebration of this gift. I want to share my memories and thoughts while I am still breathing the air on this good earthGLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2043 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Maya Angelou:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/maya_angelou.html ]

    

“Courage is the most important of all the virtues, because without courage you can’t practice any other virtue consistently. You can practice any virtue erratically, but nothing consistently without courage.”
— Maya Angelou

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
— Maya Angelou

“For Africa to me… is more than a glamorous fact. It is a historical truth. No man can know where he is going unless he knows exactly where he has been and exactly how he arrived at his present place.”
— Maya Angelou

“I believe we are still so innocent. The species are still so innocent that a person who is apt to be murdered believes that the murderer, just before he puts the final wrench on his throat, will have enough compassion to give him one sweet cup of water.”
— Maya Angelou

    

My Musings of the Day: April 3rd…

    

Thinking about Life…

Maslow's_Hierarchy_of_Needs_svgWe see a lot about how to live healthy in adds by Kaiser Permanente Medical Group. These ads emphasize the relationship of living well and thriving; they have emphasized the theme: "Live Well and THRIVE…" While these ads are intended to bring in more business for the health care giant (and I have been a client of Kaiser for nearly forty years now!), they send everyone an excellent message. There is a relationship between good health and thriving in life.
Today’s poster was shared by one of my FB family, Lynn; it features some important elements of thriving in this life. I would like to explore some of these ramifications of this in the present posting.

How much would our lives be enhanced if we looked at the mission of our lives is not to merely survive, but to THRIVE. I think that the Kaiser ad campaign draws much of its effectiveness by its exploration of this concept. We would do well to do so with our own lives. Let us examine what our mission, or purpose, is in this life. It should be more than to just exist from day to day. That would mean that we are living at a bare survival, subsistence level.

An acclaimed psychologist, Abraham Maslow, put forth a theory in the early 1940 in which he attempted to explain human motivation. This theory of developmental psychology looks at life’s motivations being based on a hierarchy of needs. It start out by looking at basic existence being at the Physiological Level, while safety of our family, loved ones, and ourselves is at the next level: Safety. From there it progresses from Love/Belonging, Self-Esteem, and capped with the Self-Actualization level. I think the Ad Men for Kaiser knew this theory well and built upon it to encourage us to move from a survival to higher and higher levels on this hierarchy.

_Maya Angelou_Mission in Life

Maya Angelou’s poetry and speaking addresses many of these same issues. This poster speaks of living with Passion, Compassion, Humor, and Style. You might think about these concepts and how they play out in your own life. This is a personal thing; it cannot be done vicariously by someone else for us! We see in these statements elements of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s concept of the "Passionate State of Mind." This allowed him to transcend the interment in the Nazi death camps during World War II and think himself above his physical limitations. It is the thing that gives us hope. It gives us a reason to live. It allows us to THRIVE!

I have had to fight the demons of being sorry for my loss of mobility and my poor health to move on to the higher levels. I have given careful consideration to the issue, in my own life, of the quality of life. After avoiding the abyss of depression over my current state and seeking only to survive, I have had to reach within myself to grab ahold of the strength within me. I have had to look at my past experiences and try to weave them into a tapestry of existence that led me to blogging and sharing my story with my FB family and friends. I approach each day with a renewed passion for life, a thankfulness for each new day that I am given.

Lift Team CroppedLast Year, on my Birthday I took a fall that required us to call out the
Riverside Fire Department Paramedics to get me up off the floor.
It took four of them! This was a turning point.

Yes, I still deal with limitations, but I’m trying to attack those limitations straight on. Contrary to what some of my health care providers have felt, I will strive to THRIVE, to make the most of my situations. I am starting into my photography again, I am motivated to write about my life experiences for the benefit of my FB family, and to leave a legacy by which my grandkids can know me when I pass. This has also renewed my interest in topics of equity, equality, and fight discrimination. How do I deal with some of my limitations? Humor; I need to laugh at them and surmount them. I have found in my writing and photography my own style, that which makes me distinctively ME. I will THRIVE.

I hope that this little exploration of the psychological and my experience will encourage you each to think about your own lives. Be thankful for each day, each challenge, each issue and mount our horse, grab our lance and tilt at the windmills like Don Quixote. Look inward and see how you can develop a new passion for life so that you, too, can THRIVE…

    

Musing for Today…

Do I believe in fate? Not necessarily. But I think we encounters two types of challenges in our daily activities. We also, as we have been discussing in recent days, found out that our genetics, environment, and previous life experiences become translated into "filters" that are used to interpret the meaning of different behaviors (actions or words) and treats in people and situations into which we are thrust during the day.

Some people consider this fate and yield themselves to the inevitable consequences. It’s almost as if they have applied, in the extreme, the theological concept of "predestination" to their daily life. We need to remember that the theologians who developed this concept, especially John Calvin and John Knox, were interpreting how they saw God affecting the lives of men; this is not undisputable, factual evidence at all. The quick lesson here is: don’t jump to conclusions just because you think something is happening because of that unforgiving fate.

_Never Expect, Never AssumeOur poster of the day starts out with some very good advice. Never expect (something to happen). Never assume (something will happen regardless of what we do). In this circumstance, I am interpreting "expect" and "assume" are giving ourselves over to the fates over which we have no control. That is not always true!

Here is a good time to remember the words of the Serenity Prayer. It goes: "God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference." There are, indeed, some things in life that we cannot change; we need to avoid wasting our energy and building frustration in doing so. But there are other things that we can change and it is our right and obligation to make every effort to make a difference. By directing our attention, energy, and resources at those things under our control will simplify our lives and give us much happiness.

The latter part of this poster is a bit convoluted, but I interpret it as saying that if something was meant to be it will be and if it is one of those areas over which we can change AND WE TAKE ACTIONS TO DO SO, things will end up being to our liking. The most important part of this whole conversation is this: exercise your mind and wisdom to take on those challenges on which we can make a difference. This will not only be more productive, but will lower our frustration level which will make us even more productive — productivity times two, if you will!

Think how this could help you in your daily battles. Be smart. Be wise. Be HAPPY! Think about it…

    
Photo of the Day:

For our photo of the day, I want to share a photo I took last weekend on our trek to downtown Riverside. We had intended to visit the Farmer’s Market on the downtown walking mall, visit the Mission Inn, and go to the downtown library. This was to be a combined photo expedition and exploration of these downtown landmarks.

When we arrived, we discovered some real treasures. On the mall, the city had installed several monuments to individuals making significant contributions to mankind. I share with you one of the photos I shot of the memorial to Mahatma Gandhi known for his advocacy of non-violent resistance as a tactic for organizational change. There is a lot of detail about the base, but that will need to await another day. Given our discussions above, I think Gandhi personified one who has put several of the suggestions into practice. Enjoy and be edified…

Gandhi-Full-View_Cropped_IM

Tribute to Gandhi. (Photo Credit: ©2012 Gerald L. Boerner)

Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

    

References

    

Background information is from Wikipedia articles on:

Wikipedia: Abraham Maslow: Theory of Motivation — Hierarchy of Needs…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow’s_hierarchy_of_needs

Prof. Boerner’s Explorations: In Memoriam — Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Dying for his Christian Duty…
http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=27780

Written by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb_thumb_

Welcome, My FB Family…

Warmer night! It was supposed to be in the upper 40s last night and was already 50 degrees when I went to bed at midnight; I woke up this morning to an outside temp of 52, so I don’t know if it got down as low as the weatherman’s crystal ball, I mean, projection model had predicted. I hope that the same does not apply to the high predicted today; an 81 is predicted and I am not ready for higher temps yet!!! Summer will just have to wait as far as I’m concerned.

_Mission Inn_redroofMission Inn: Redroof  (Photo Credit: ©Don O’Neill)

This weekend the temps are supposed to to drop down to the 60s again and a possibility of rain Saturday night. I hope the rain does stay away until the evening, because Grace and I are going to the Downtown Farmer’s Market again, Lord willing and the shuttle comes as requested. It will be interesting to see what they have and an overcast day will be great for photos. We are going to check out a store across from the Mission Inn that handles Don O’Neill’s watercolor prints (postcard size). I love some of the samples that I’ve seen on his web site; O’Neill was a resident of Riverside until he passed in 2008. Many of his paintings are set in and about River City here. Then on to the Mission Inn and especially to the Downtown Public Library. We haven’t been there for many, many years. Again, photo op of Grace in and about the Gazebo from our sister city, Sendai. Looking forward to a great outing…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2263 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Alaska:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/alaska.html ]

    

“America is looking for answers. She’s looking for a new direction; the world is looking for a light. That light can come from America’s great North Star; it can come from Alaska.”
— Sarah Palin

“In one line of his poem he said good fences make good neighbors. I’d like to think that Alaska and British Columbia working together can prove that we can be pretty darned good neighbors without fences.”
— Dan Miller

“A changing environment will affect Alaska more than any other state, because of our location. I’m not one though who would attribute it to being man-made.”
— Sarah Palin

“But again, you know, the views that we’ve expressed are transferring power back from the federal government to the states, giving Alaska an incredible opportunity to expand its economy, especially at a time when our federal government is coming close to bankruptcy.So that is a broad-based appeal. It’s not an extreme view.”
— Joe Miller

    

My Musings of the Day: March 30th…

    

Successful Visit to Goeske Center…

Well, yesterday morning we actually got to the Goeske Center, one of Riverside’s Senior Centers. Shuttle bus was a little late, but it came and we got to the Goeske Center. Grace had called the day before and they told us to go to the main desk and someone on duty would give us a tour of the facility. So we followed those instructions; they gave us a brochure of the facility and activities before going on the tour, which was very interesting. The facility is quite large, has a couple of exercise rooms, a couple of large lobby areas for small groups to assemble, and a number of smaller meeting rooms where classes and other groups can meet. There is even a small computer center with six computers hooked up to the Internet.

Goeske Center_Collage-1

As we were talking to the ladies at the front desk, we found out that the center had lost there computer teacher several months ago. So, what do you suppose that Grace did? Volunteer to teach some classes? NO! She volunteered yours truly! Well, I was handed the form for volunteering and I filled it out. You would have thought that Moses had just walked through the door — LOL! Before we left, I talked with the director of the center about it and looks like a may have yet another thing to do — in my spare time! Between researching material for these FB postings for my dear FB family and writing my blog articles, most of my day is occupied. But, I think that I will be able to work in a morning once a week; it probably will not start until June. I’ll keep you informed on this new activity as it becomes clearer.

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1946 Words ]
    

    
Artist’s Quote of the Day…

Artist: Charles Baudelaire

Quote:
“From that moment onwards, our loathsome society rushed, like Narcissus, to contemplate its trivial image on a metallic plate. A form of lunacy, an extraordinary fanaticism took hold of these new sun-worshippers.”

Short Bio Statement: Charles Baudelaire, a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator; Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=7335

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Baudelaire_cropCharles Pierre Baudelaire (1821 – 1867) was a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator. A controversial figure in his lifetime, Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence. At the same time his works, in particular his book of poetry Les fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), have been acknowledged as classics of French literature.
 
Baudelaire was educated in Lyon, where he was forced to board away from his mother (even during holidays) and accept his stepfather’s rigid methods, which included depriving him of visits home when his grades slipped. He wrote when recalling those times: “A shudder at the grim years of claustration [...] the unease of wretched and abandoned childhood, the hatred of tyrannical schoolfellows, and the solitude of the heart.” Baudelaire at fourteen was described by a classmate: “He was much more refined and distinguished than any of our fellow pupils [...] we are bound to one another[...] by shared tastes and sympathies, the precocious love of fine works of literature”. Later, he attended the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris. Baudelaire was erratic in his studies, at times diligent, at other times prone to “idleness.”
 
At eighteen, Baudelaire was described as “an exalted character, sometimes full of mysticism, and sometimes full of immorality and cynicism (which were excessive but only verbal).” Upon gaining his degree in 1839, he was undecided about his future. He told his brother “I don’t feel I have a vocation for anything.” His stepfather had in mind a career in law or diplomacy, but instead Baudelaire decided to embark upon a literary career, and for the next two years led an irregular life, socializing with other bohemian artists and writers.
 
Baudelaire began to frequent prostitutes and may have contracted gonorrhea and syphilis during this period. He went to a pharmacist known for venereal disease treatments, on recommendation of his older brother Alphonse, a magistrate. For a while, he took on a prostitute named Sara as his mistress and lived with his brother when his funds were low. His stepfather kept him on a tight allowance which he spent as quickly as he received it. Baudelaire began to run up debts, mostly for clothes. His stepfather demanded an accounting and wrote to Alphonse: “The moment has come when something must be done to save your brother from absolute perdition.” In the hope of reforming him and making a man of him, his stepfather sent him on a voyage to Calcutta, India in 1841, under the care of a former naval captain. Baudelaire’s mother was distressed both by his poor behavior and by the proposed solution.  (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1291 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: David Bailey

Quote:
“It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter, because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the ordinary.”

Short Bio Statement: David Bailey, an English photographer who helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s…

For more information, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bailey_(photographer)

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

David Bailey_PhotographerDavid Royston Bailey CBE (born 2 January 1938) is an English photographer. Bailey developed a love of natural history, and this led him into photography. Suffering from undiagnosed dyslexia, he experienced problems at school. He attended a private school, Clark’s College in Ilford, where he says they taught him less than the more basic council school. As well as dyslexia he also has the motor skill disorder dyspraxia.

In 1959 he became a photographic assistant at the John French studio, and in May 1960, he was a photographer for John Cole’s Studio Five before being contracted as a fashion photographer for British Vogue magazine later that year. He also undertook a large amount of freelance work.
 
Along with Terence Donovan and Brian Duffy, he captured and helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s: a culture of high fashion and celebrity chic. The three photographers socialized with actors, musicians and royalty, and found themselves elevated to celebrity status. Together, they were the first real celebrity photographers, named by Norman Parkinson as "the Black Trinity".
 
The film Blowup (1966), directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, concerns the work and sexual habits of a London fashion photographer played by David Hemmings and is largely based on Bailey.
 
The "Swinging London" scene was aptly reflected in his Box of Pin-Ups (1964): a box of poster-prints of 1960s celebrities and socialites including Terence Stamp, The Beatles, Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, PJ Proby, Cecil Beaton, Rudolf Nureyev, Andy Warhol and notorious East End gangsters the Kray twins.
 
The box was an unusual and unique commercial release, and it reflected the changing status of the photographer that one could sell a collection of prints in this way. (The strong objection to the presence of the Krays on the part of fellow photographer Lord Snowdon was the major reason no American edition of the "Box" ever appeared, nor a British second edition issued.) The record sale for a copy of ‘Box of Pin-Ups’ is reported as "north of £20,000".
 
Bailey’s ascent at Vogue was meteoric. Within months he was shooting covers and at the height of his productivity he shot 800 pages of Vogue editorial in one year. Penelope Tree, a former girlfriend, described him as "the king lion on the Savannah: incredibly attractive, with a dangerous vibe. He was the electricity, the brightest, most powerful, most talented, most energetic force at the magazine".
 
American Vogue’s creative director Grace Coddington, then a model herself said "It was the Sixties, it was a raving time, and Bailey was unbelievably good-looking. He was everything that you wanted him to be – like the Beatles but accessible – and when he went on the market everyone went in. We were all killing ourselves to be his model, although he hooked up with Jean Shrimpton pretty quickly".  (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1094 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Paul Strand

Quote:
“Honesty no less than intensity of vision is the prerequisite of a living expression. This means a real respect for the thing in front of… the photographer… this is accomplished without tricks of process or manipulation through the use of straight photographic methods…”

Short Bio Statement: Paul Strand, an American photographer and filmmaker who helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=2329

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Paul Strand PortraitPaul Strand was an American photographer and filmmaker who, along with fellow modernist photographers like Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston, helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century. His diverse body of work, spanning six decades, covers numerous genres and subjects throughout the Americas, Europe and Africa.
 
Born in New York City to Bohemian parents, in his late teens Strand was a student of renowned documentary photographer Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. It was while on a fieldtrip in this class that Strand first visited the 291 art gallery – operated by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – where exhibitions of work by forward-thinking modernist photographers and painters would move Strand to take his photographic hobby more seriously. Stieglitz would later promote Strand’s work in the 291 gallery itself, in his photography publication Camera Work, and in his artwork in the Hieninglatzing studio.

Some of this early work, like the well-known "Wall Street," experimented with formal abstractions (influencing, among others, Edward Hopper and his idiosyncratic urban vision). Other of Strand’s works reflect his interest in using the camera as a tool for social reform. He was one of the founders of the Photo League, an association of photographers who advocated using their art to promote social and political causes.  (Wikipedia)

Strand subsequently traveled to Mexico, where he photographed the landscape, architecture, folk art, and people and in 1934 produced a film about fishermen for the Mexican government. Thirteen years earlier he had collaborated with Charles Sheeler on a film, Manhatta, a study of the urban high-rise environment. Having returned to New York late in 1934, Strand devoted his energies to theater and filmmaking cooperatives.

In 1943 Strand resumed his still photography, focusing on the people and surroundings of New England. In the early 1950s he moved to Europe, spending six weeks in the northern Italian agrarian community of Luzzara and later traveling to the Outer Hebrides, islands off the northwest coast of Scotland. He traveled and photographed in North and West Africa in the 1960s.  (Getty Museum)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb[2]Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

[ 1293 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Sebastião Salgado

Quote:
“Most of the information we now get is through television and is mutilated. Photography offers the opportunity to spend much more time on a topic. It’s relatively cheaper medium, and can allow a photographer really to live in another place, show another reality, get closer to the truth.”

Short Bio Statement: Sebastião Salgado, a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=3474

Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Sebastião Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist. It’s not just that this celebrated Brazilian photojournalist has been sniffling since he arrived in the city, explaining: “I was born in a tropical ecosystem. I’m not used to these plants.” It’s also that he peppers his description of the city with words like strange and crazy, noting that he was mesmerized by the sight of the endless stream of automobile traffic as his plane made its descent.

After a somewhat itinerant childhood, Salgado initially trained as an economist, earning a master’s degree in economics from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. He began work as an economist for the International Coffee Organization, often traveling to Africa on missions for the World Bank, when he first started seriously taking photographs. He travelled often to Africa on missions affiliated with the World Bank. It was then that he first began taking his first photographs. On his return to London these images began to preoccupy him, and he abandoned his career as an economist. At the beginning of 1973 he and his wife returned to Paris so that he could begin his life as a photographer.

Salgado initially worked with the Paris based agency Gamma, but in 1979 he joined the international cooperative of photographers Magnum Photos. He left Magnum in 1994 and formed his own agency, Amazonas Images, in Paris to represent his work. He is particularly noted for his social documentary photography of workers in less developed nations. Longtime gallery director Hal Gould considers Salgado to be the most important photographer of the early century, and gave him his first show in the United States.

Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, and Migrations. The latter two are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world. His most famous pictures are of a gold mine in Brazil called Serra Pelada. He is presently working on a project called Genesis, photographing the landscape, flora and fauna of places on earth that have not been taken over by man.

In September and October 2007, Salgado displayed his photographs of coffee workers from India, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Brazil at the Brazilian Embassy in London. The aim of the project was to raise public awareness of the origins of the popular drink. (Wikipedia)

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Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1159 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Harry Callahan

Quote:     
“I do believe strongly in photography and hope by following it intuitively that when the photographs are looked at they will touch the spirit in people.”

Short Bio Statement: Harry Callahan, an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=5445

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Harry Morey Callahan (1912 – 1999) was an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography. He was born in Detroit, Michigan and started photographing in 1938 as an autodidact. By 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design.
 
Callahan left almost no written records–no diaries, letters, scrapbooks or teaching notes. His technical photographic method was to go out almost every morning, walk the city he lived in and take numerous pictures. He then spent almost every afternoon making proof prints of that day’s best negatives. Yet, for all his photographic activity, Callahan, at his own estimation, produced no more than half a dozen final images a year.
 
He photographed his wife, Eleanor, and daughter, Barbara, and the streets, scenes and buildings of cities where he lived, showing a strong sense of line and form, and light and darkness. He also worked with multiple exposures. Callahan’s work was a deeply personal response to his own life. He was well known to encourage his students to turn their cameras on their lives, and he led by example. Callahan photographed his wife over a period of fifteen years, as his prime subject. Eleanor was essential to his art from 1947 to 1960. He photographed her everywhere – at home, in the city streets, in the landscape; alone, with their daughter, in black and white and in color, nude and clothed, distant and close. He tried several technical experiments — double and triple exposure, blurs, large and small format film.
 
Sarah Greenough in her analysis of Harry Callahan, talk of his early life photographing his wife Eleanor…

“Yet it was with his series of photographs of Eleanor, more than with any other subject, that Callahan most fully learned what it meant to see photographically. Although he had photographed her intermittently before, beginning in 1947 he photographed Eleanor extensively for more than a decade and during that time she was central not only to his emotional, physical, and spiritual life, but also to his artistic development. He recorded her, as he recalls, "In an endless number of ways": nude and clothed; in parks, streets, and city squares; on the beach, in the water, in tents, and in the woods; in the privacy of their home – their ballroom studio or their bedroom – and the homes of relatives; in this country and in Europe; with their daughter Barbara or alone…"  (Wikipedia)

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb

Another day has dawned. On this day, we witnessed a couple events surrounding World War I. Before the entry of U.S. troops into that conflict, we witnessed development of two support units for General Pershing’s expeditionary force seeking the Mexican raiders led by Pancho Villa. Following World War I, this day, in the U.S. Senate, witnessed the second attempt to gain ratification of the Treaty of Versailles was defeated led by Republican forces under the leadership of Henry Cabot Lodge. This marked not only a defeat of the program of President Woodrow Wilson, but also a repudiation of the U.S. as a active participant in the international community of nations.

Bantam-jeep-1

This day also witness the manufacture of the one millionth Jeep, that ubiquitous army vehicle, to the U.S. Army. More recently, this day witnessed the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the second Persian Gulf War. On the lighter side, this was a day of two major firsts for television: the first Academy Awards Ceremony, hosted by Bob Hope, televised live and later this day would witness the first televising of the day-to-day business of our Congress on C-SPAN. That was this day in history, the 19th of March…

    
A More Detailed Look at Today’s Event History:

The major events of the day took place just before and just after World War I. Prior to that world conflict, taking place mainly in western Europe, we were, in 1916, embroiled in a conflict along the southern borders of the U.S. between Texas and Arizona. Pancho Villa, leading an army of Mexican peasants, would raid towns across the U.S.–Mexico border. One of the most famous of these raids was on the border town of Columbus, New Mexico; during this raid the town was burned to the ground. General John "Black Jack" Pershing and his expeditionary force received orders to pursue and capture and/or kill Pancho Villa. Two new military groups participated in this campaign of the Mexican American War. These two new support units were the motorized cavalry under Lt. George Patton and the founding of the first U.S. air combat force, the First Aero Squadron, based in Columbus, New Mexico; this town was the site of one of Pancho Villa’s more famous border raids. The Aero Squadron served primarily scouting duties during this campaign. They would serve well over France in the conflict taking Place over France.

1st_aero

Following the end of the First World War in 1919, the United States, England and France would draft the formal treaty that the Germans were forced to sign. This document, the Treaty of Versailles, called for the formation of a League of Nations after the model set forth by Woodrow Wilson in his 14 Points. This treaty was designed to protect and expand the colonial empires of England and France under the guise of create "Protectorates" overseen by each of these powers. The U.S. also received some protectorates, especially in the Pacific, but we were not at that time a colonial power.

The problem, however, was this treaty required ratification by the U.S. Senate, which was in control of anti-Wilson Republicans led by men like Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. The latter was especially active, in 1920, when this treaty came up for ratification a second time. This Senate action marked not only a defeat of the program of President Woodrow Wilson, but also a repudiation of the U.S. as a active participant in the international community of nations. We would never formally join the League of Nations and we would suffer, along with the democratic countries of Europe, the pains of war again when Adolf Hitler came into power as German Chancellor in 1933.

Two additional military events celebrated milestones on this day as well. In 1952, during the Korean War, the one millionth Jeep was manufactured. The jeep was introduced as an all-purpose, all-terrain vehicle to provide our troops with mobility during World War II and the Korean War. This milestone in the manufacturing of the functional, no-frills vehicle was a celebration of the success of a concept — mobility on the battlefield.

More recently, we witnessed on this day in 2003, the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom by President George W. Bush. This operation was part of the second Persian Gulf War and part of the U.S. war on terrorism following the attacks of 9-11 in New York City, Pennsylvania, and the Pentagon in Virginia. Unlike the first Persian Gulf War, this military action was basically an U.S. action with a loose coalition of western European allies, especially the United Kingdom. Also, unlike the first Persian Gulf War, there was no coalition or support by our friends in the Arab world. While successful in removing Saddam Hussein from power, it has not bring real brought democracy or real freedom to that troubled country.

USMC_469

We also witnessed a couple of firsts in the television arena. In 1953, we witnessed the first live showing of the annual Academy Awards show. This 25th edition of the awards ceremony was hosted for the first time by Bob Hope and was the occasion of Cecil B. DeMilles winning the Best Picture award for "The Greatest Show on Earth." The ceremony was broadcast by NBC Television. Also on this day, in 1979, the country witnessed the first live broadcast of the day-to-day activities of the U.S. House of Representatives; these broadcasts were carried by C-SPAN.

And that was this day in history. It was filled with several significant events that have shaped and molded this great country of ours!

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

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Quotations Related to Woodrow Wilson:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/w/woodrow_wilson.html ]

    

“A conservative is a man who just sits and thinks, mostly sits.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“A conservative is someone who makes no changes and consults his grandmother when in doubt.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“Absolute identity with one’s cause is the first and great condition of successful leadership.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“A little group of willful men, representing no opinion but their own, have rendered the great government of the United States helpless and contemptible.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“America lives in the heart of every man everywhere who wishes to find a region where he will be free to work out his destiny as he chooses.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“America was established not to create wealth but to realize a vision, to realize an ideal – to discover and maintain liberty among men.”
— Woodrow Wilson

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